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REVIEW: Olympus Has Fallen (Blu Ray) | ManlyMovie

REVIEW: Olympus Has Fallen (Blu Ray)

There was a term that circulated around in the 90’s when real action movies were still in hot demand – ‘Die Hard Clone’.  The term was used to describe Die Hard ripoffs where a one man army would take on a crew of specialist killers.  The ingredients all remained the same:  Articulated swearing, copious machine gun fire, a  villain just in it for the money and a closely confined environment.  The locale was the only real variation from one movie to the next.  In Sudden Death, it was a locked down hockey stadium.  In Under Siege, it was a nuclear-equipped battleship (excellent premise) and in Under Siege 2, it was a hijacked train.  When action movies changed, the term was forgotten and in disuse even before the internet exploded, so it doesn’t even track well in Google.  Well, it’s time to bring it back.  It’s 2013 and we got ourselves a fucking Die Hard Clone.  It’s been too long.


The location:  The White House.  The enemy: North Korean nutjobs.  The One Man Army:  Gerard Butler, who really does strike a few ‘young Bruce Willis’ chords, again.  Put in charge of directing is Antoine Fuqua, the guy who brought us Shooter, Training Day and Brooklyn’s Finest.  This is a recipe for success and a relief for the drought of oldschool action.  And that’s exactly what we get.  In the movie, Butler is a disgraced Secret Service Operative busted down to a lowly security job elsewhere in the capital.  When the North Koreans attack the White House with an AC-130 (!), and take over it with covert Special Forces, Butler’s former U.S. Ranger is drawn to the chaos like a fly to shit.  With Duke Nukem mode fully engaged, Butler begins despatching the Commies with extreme prejudice.  All this within the first 16 minutes, a time which the enemy boasts of as a remarkably efficient takeover.

Of course, there’s another movie out this year with a near identical premise.  You might even confuse the two, the other one being ‘White House Down’.  Despite it’s similar story, that movie can’t realistically be called a Die Hard Clone.  It is PG-13.  This movie is Rated-R and was clearly designed this way from day one.  Soccer moms may approve of the cookie cutter antics of Jamie Foxx and Channing Tatum in White House Down, but they most certainly will not approve of men being stabbed in the brain, relentless swearing and more bodies than the Vietnam War In Olympus Has Fallen.  There are a few things missing though.  In Die Hard, Rickman was a slick and unforgettable villain.  In Under Siege, Tommy Lee Jones and Gary Busey were the villains. And in a good Die Hard Clone, the hero will take a break from wholesale killin’ and verbally assault his foe with a string of threats and one-liners over the radio, and in return the bad guy will hold his own.  Yune though, while sporting the appropriately manly villainous name of ‘Kang’, is no Tommy Lee Jones, he’s pretty generic.  He’s not charismatic at all.  The movie also loses a bit of its massively kinetic pacing and torque in the second half, you could even call the finale anti climatic.

The Blu Ray release is pretty standard issue.  Starting with the transfer, there are ups and there are downs.  On the one hand, the transfer is excellent, which is always the case nowadays.  It’s so expected that you barely even need talk about it, we won’t need transfer-heavy analysis much with standard Blu Ray’s as much as we will 4k or 3D releases.  However, it does present a downside.  Things become apparent that we may not have noticed in the theatre, mainly the CGI.  It’s fucking awful.  The AC-130 in the opening sequence looks like something from a PS3 game.  An early PS3 game.  The greenscreen is more apparent too, although not as downright offensively bad and intrusive as ‘White House Down’.  Elsewhere, extras are also generic.  Six features, but mostly short and ‘youtube-ish’, mainly quick on-set interviews.  There is also no director’s commentary, at least not on the disc I have in my hands.

Not compulsory, but definitely recommended. 

Movie: 8/10
Disc Release: 6/10